1. 20 common grammar mistakes →

  2. The Humble Nudge: "Have got" has got to go →

    humblenudge:

    English grammar isn’t the hardest. Future tenses notwithstanding, it’s pretty structured, with clear reason to use what when, obvious key words and phrases as a guide and, within the tense, forms don’t change much — he/she/it, das -s muss mit, but all the rest stays the same, and the past simple…

  3. A grammar lesson from the local paper

    A grammar lesson from the local paper

  4. The Daily Show with Jon StewartMon - Thurs 11p / 10c
    Democalypse 2012 - Do We Look Stupid? Don't Answer That Edition
    www.thedailyshow.com
    Daily Show Full EpisodesPolitical Humor & Satire BlogThe Daily Show on Facebook


    The Daily Show with Jon StewartMon - Thurs 11p / 10c
    Democalypse 2012 - Do We Look Stupid? Don't Answer That Edition - Grammatical Gaffes
    www.thedailyshow.com
    Daily Show Full EpisodesPolitical Humor & Satire BlogThe Daily Show on Facebook

    Jon Stewart explains the importance of demonstrative pronouns. This vs. that.

  5. 'Wall Street Journal' Pushes Grammar Panic - Lingua Franca →

    By Geoffrey Pullum, chronicle.com

    In the past week or so peo­ple have been urg­ing Lin­gua Fran­ca to com­ment on an arti­cle by Sue Shel­len­barg­er in The Wall Street Jour­nal on June 20, head­ed: “This Embar­rass­es You and I*: Gram­mar Gaffes Invade the Office in an Age…

  6. Don’t forget your teethbrush
Posted by Andy Bodle, guardian.co.uk
Arts minister, but art thieves. Drugs tsar, but drug dealers. When you put a noun in front of another noun, should it be singular or plural?We’d just taken our seats in a Vietnamese restaurant when my companion pointed at the menu and giggled. …

    Don’t forget your teethbrush
    Posted by Andy Bodle, guardian.co.uk

    Arts minister, but art thieves. Drugs tsar, but drug dealers. When you put a noun in front of another noun, should it be singular or plural?

    We’d just taken our seats in a Vietnamese restaurant when my companion pointed at the menu and giggled. …

  7. English edits. Everywhere.

    English edits. Everywhere.

  8. Forming sentences with 2 verbs is one of the last and most difficult steps to mastering (especially spoken) English. For example: The car continued driving down the street.
Or is it: The car continued to drive down the street.
Sometimes it doesn’t matter. Sometimes it does. The problem: There aren’t a lot of rules to help you know when the second verb takes the infinitive form or the -ing. You just have to learn the patterns and, over time, develop a feel for it.
Maybe this photo will help get you started. From Face2Face by Chris Redston and Gillie Cunningham, published by Cambridge.

    Forming sentences with 2 verbs is one of the last and most difficult steps to mastering (especially spoken) English. For example: The car continued driving down the street.

    Or is it: The car continued to drive down the street.

    Sometimes it doesn’t matter. Sometimes it does. The problem: There aren’t a lot of rules to help you know when the second verb takes the infinitive form or the -ing. You just have to learn the patterns and, over time, develop a feel for it.

    Maybe this photo will help get you started. From Face2Face by Chris Redston and Gillie Cunningham, published by Cambridge.

  9. When singular are plural →

    It is a similar problem when talking about companies, countries and governments. Are they a single entity or representative of the sum of its (their?) parts?

    "Apple is the wealthiest company in the world." Sounds much better than, "Apple are … ." But a sentence later, when a pronoun takes the place of the proper noun, things get fuzzier: It makes popular technology devices.

    Maybe it’s just my personal style, but using “it” drains the subject of its (their?) humanity. As if there aren’t a bunch of thinking, autonomous people making up the company, dreaming up that technology, designing it, shaping it, producing it and ultimately using it. As if the company stands on its own — stoic, uniform and pre-determined. A kind of Skynet of business.

    "Apple is the wealthiest company in the world. They make popular technology devices.”

    Can that really stand? I will have to put on my (one pair of) glasses, which are on the table next to me, and read it again.

  10. Weeding the language garden →