1. The importance of punctuation. I don’t believe epicurious wants you to boil your potatoes for two thousand five-hundred thirty minutes. That’s more than 42 hours of cooking.

Probably 25-30 minutes is more reasonable.

Never underestimate the power of the hyphen.

    The importance of punctuation. I don’t believe epicurious wants you to boil your potatoes for two thousand five-hundred thirty minutes. That’s more than 42 hours of cooking.

    Probably 25-30 minutes is more reasonable.

    Never underestimate the power of the hyphen.

  2. More than you want to know about the great Comma →

  3. Something’s wrong here, and we’ve seen this mistake before. Can you spot it?

    Something’s wrong here, and we’ve seen this mistake before. Can you spot it?

  4. A poster-sized render of an old, first-draft cover for Pelican Books. But something’s missing. What?

    A poster-sized render of an old, first-draft cover for Pelican Books. But something’s missing. What?

  5. Oxford, birthplace of the Oxford Comma.
What exactly is the Oxford Comma, you ask? For some, it is a vital piece of punctuation — never write a three-or-more item list without one. For others, it is an ugly and useless stop sign getting in the way of your reading.
I grew up using the Oxford Comma — that final comma before the conjunction (e.g., and, or, but) — then unlearned it years later at journalism school.
The debate over its necessity continues, and I suspect always will. 
What do you think: Is the Oxford Comma a must, a must not[,] or up to the writer?

    Oxford, birthplace of the Oxford Comma.

    What exactly is the Oxford Comma, you ask? For some, it is a vital piece of punctuation — never write a three-or-more item list without one. For others, it is an ugly and useless stop sign getting in the way of your reading.

    I grew up using the Oxford Comma — that final comma before the conjunction (e.g., and, or, but) — then unlearned it years later at journalism school.

    The debate over its necessity continues, and I suspect always will. 

    What do you think: Is the Oxford Comma a must, a must not[,] or up to the writer?

  6. Even native speakers can get commas wrong. Can you beat the textbook and put in the punctuation that should be there?

    Even native speakers can get commas wrong. Can you beat the textbook and put in the punctuation that should be there?